diaphragm muscle

“The Art of Breathing: Drawing the Diaphragm”, By Rolf Sovik, article in Yoga International

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This article is very interesting to help with the visualization of this very important muscle called the Diaphragm. In Osteopathy, the Diaphragm  is a key structure to assess; it is also called the main breathing muscle.

The Diaphragm has many anatomical connections with visceras/internal organs: two main blood vessels go through it (vena cava and abdominal aorta), its movement during inhalation and exhalation encourage intestinal transit/bowel movements, helping to drain the body toxins, and it also delimits the boundary between the thoracic cavity and the abdominal cavity. Therefore, the Diaphragm muscle is a key area to check due to its implication in the balance between the thoracic pressure and the abdominal pressure. Any dysfunction affecting this muscle will have consequences on the body function.

https://yogainternational.com/article/view/the-art-of-breathing-drawing-the-diaphragm

“The Continuity of the Body: Hypothesis of Treatment of the Five Diaphragms”, PubMed article, By Bordoni B. & Zanier E.

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“Abstract

The diaphragm muscle should not be seen as a segment but as part of a body system. This muscle is an important crossroads of information for the entire body, from the trigeminal system to the pelvic floor, passing from thoracic diaphragm to the floor of the mouth: the network of breath. Viola Frymann first spoke of the treatment of three diaphragms, and more recently four diaphragms have been discussed. Current scientific knowledge has led to discussion of the manual treatment of five diaphragms. This article highlights the anatomic connections and fascial and neurologic aspects of the diaphragm muscle, with four other structures considered as diaphragms: that is, the five diaphragms. The logic of the manual treatment proposed here is based on a concept and diagnostic work that should be the basis for any area of the body: The patient never just has a localized symptom but rather a system that adapts to a question.”

Full article link below:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25775273/