cranial osteopathy

Sutherland’s Legacy in the New Millennium: The Osteopathic Cranial Model and Modern Osteopathy.

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“Abstract

The concept of cranial osteopathy was introduced by W. G. Sutherland, DO, and became the foundation for setting the rules for use of skull palpation and many other techniques in the many types of dysfunctional patterns that craniosacral therapy treats. Sutherland’s theories enabled modern osteopathy to develop and improve. The mechanism of primary respiration as well as the motion of neurocranial and viscerocranial sutures are phenomena intrinsic to the field and can be found in every living organism, independent of thoracic breathing and cardiac impulse. The sphenobasilar synchondrosis (ie, the joint between the base of the occiput and the body of the sphenoid bone) is the pillar supporting the concepts of craniosacral therapy. This article compares the cranial model devised by Sutherland with the present, relevant scientific research, aiming at clarifying the possibility of applying the craniosacral model in the new millennium.”

By Bordoni B., Zanier E.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25831430

“Emotional Traumas effects on children”, By Children Health Team, Cleveland Clinic

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“Traumatic events in children’s lives can have the same effect as head trauma, a new study says.

The study, published recently in the Journal of Psychiatric Research, finds that emotional trauma at a young age may cause changes to the brain that are similar to head trauma.

The connection between emotional trauma’s and physical trauma’s effect on the brain is an increase in a protein called S100B.  S100B is a protein usually found in the brain. But when the protein makes its way to the blood, this is a sign that the barrier that separates the brain from the rest of the body is leaky. This enables inflammatory compounds to make their way to the brain and perpetuate inflammation in the brain, often called neuroinflammation.

[…]

Dr. Falcone’s research team found that the same thing happens with emotional trauma as with physical trauma: the S100B protein levels are higher than normal. What’s more, the worse the trauma, the higher the levels of the S100B protein.

The researchers identified three important stressors that impact the intensity of the emotional trauma: how early in childhood the trauma occurred (if the trauma happen before age 8), the level of the trauma’s severity and whether the emotional trauma lasted longer than six months.

[…]

Although her team’s study results suggest a childhood trauma could cause inflammation in the brain that’s similar to what is seen in concussion, this inflammation could linger. This could lead to long-term consequences such as the development of psychiatric disorders later.”

By Children Health Team at Cleveland Clinic

Full article link below:

http://health.clevelandclinic.org/2015/03/emotional-traumas-surprising-effect-on-children/?utm_campaign=cc+posts&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook&utm_content=150317+emotional+trauma&dynid=facebook-_-cc+posts-_-social-_-social-_-150317+emotional+trauma

“Craniosacral-therapy for people seeking relief from stress, muscle strain, somatic dysfunction”, By Nicole Nalepa & Joseph Wenzel IV, News Editor

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“A light-touch technique is gaining popularity among those dealing with pain and disorders.

[…]

Craniosacral therapy is a new kind of holistic treatment that’s started gaining popularity with some who are looking for relief from stress, strained muscles, or a dysfunction.
[…]

The difference between craniosacral therapy and a massage is therapists aren’t pushing the tissue around, they are mobilizing the tissue through a very light, manual touch on and along the bones, which are located from your skull all the way down to your pelvis.

[…]

“The ability to feel or palpate, is a trained, refined sensitivity in your hands,” Larson said. “What this does is it gets to the core. It really helps that central nervous system reset.”

Larson said she can feel the patterns of strain in the cerebrospinal fluid, which houses the brain and spinal column.

The weight of the pressure that you’re seeing being exerted right now on this client is […] between 0 grams to 5 grams; and 5 grams being the equivalent to the weight of a nickel.

[…]

“It’s not like a deep-tissue massage, or anything like that. It’s very, very relaxing, but in a different way,” Paradis said. “When I came in it was like my brain was having a little meltdown; there were all these synapses going off and little fireworks; and by the time I left that was kind of all calmed down and I could think clearly and process easier.”

Since her first session, four months ago, her daily headaches have stopped and she says she has been able to sleep better.[…]”

By Nicole Nalepa and Joseph Wenzel

For Cheryl Larson, licensed massage therapist
Full link to article below:

http://www.wfsb.com/story/28708086/craniosacral-therapy-become-popular-for-people-seeking-relief