emotional trauma

Fertility & preconception, by Ingefleur Homeopathy

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” […] With the introduction of the contraceptive pill women have gotten more control over what is happening to their body when it comes to not falling pregnant. However, as many women have experienced, getting pregnant after several years of contraception may now not be so easy. This is not only because the natural hormone cycle is disturbed with contraception but also because women increasingly start having children at a later age.

Whether you have been on contraception or not, if you want to get pregnant the most important thing is that you are in the best health possible. To give your baby a good start you want the “soil” to be the best possible right? This means that your body systems should work the best possible and your toxicity levels as low as possible (this includes stress!), and that there needs to be plenty of nutrition. Remember that although the baby develops in your body and you need to be in the best condition possible, when trying for a baby your partner needs to be in the best health possible too!

Many factors can influence difficulty in conceiving. Factors for both males and females:

  • Obesity or lack of nutrition
  • Infections such as sexually transmitted diseases
  • Toxic metal levels in the body
  • Increased alcohol intrake
  • Smoking
  • Chronic stress
  • Unbalanced hormonal levels
  • Physical or emotional trauma
  • (Recreational) drugs
  • Chronic disease such as diabetes

Male specific factors that affect fertility:

  • Occupations that overheat the scrotum area such as men working in bakeries
  • Varicose veins in scrotum area
  • Other conditions such as raised sperm antibodies or chromosomal abnormalities

Female specific factors that affect fertility:

  • Chronic disease such as endometriosis, polycystic ovaries syndrome, diabetes
  • Fibroids
  • Structural abnormalities such as a tilted uterus
  • Hyper acidity
  • Chronic candida infection

This can be a scary list, however… many of these things can be dealt with! Some of the issues above you and partner can tackle yourselves:

  • Make any needed lifestyle changes. Make sure you get all your vitamins, minerals and fatty acids. Reduce alcohol intake, sugar intake, loose some weight if needed, consider seeing a nutritionist. Sleep enough, and get those stress levels down!
  • Make sure the guy’s semen is not overheated. So wear loose fitting underwear and clothing. Examine your lifestyle to see if there is anything that may cause overheating such as cycling or working in a bakery.
  • If you have been on the contraceptive pill, injections or coil, make sure you wait three months before you start trying (use condoms in the mean time). If you had a miscarriage wait preferably longer than that; up to 6 months to help the body recover from the trauma.
  • Don’t worry too much about when you are ovulating, just make sure you have sex three times a week at least. Charting can help however to give you an idea of whether you are ovulating and when.

Some of the factors in the (in)fertility list are not easily fixable with lifestyle changes. If you have done all the above and after 7 months to a year you have not fallen pregnant yet, it is a good idea to get yourselves checked out. Go to your GP and have all the regular tests done to see if there are any obvious reasons that you haven’t conceived yet.

Even if the tests are inconclusive however, homeopathic treatment can greatly raise your chances of conceiving.

[…]

Tip: if you like flower essences, try the Woman combination from Australian Bushflowers. It is a combination of flower essences aimed at anything female including premenstrual symptoms, menstrual symptoms, conception, pregnancy, post pregnancy and menopause. It is available in drops, a oral spray, and a cream (yummy!).”

By Ingefleur Spreij

Full article link below:

http://www.ingefleur.com/fertility.html

“Emotional Traumas effects on children”, By Children Health Team, Cleveland Clinic

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“Traumatic events in children’s lives can have the same effect as head trauma, a new study says.

The study, published recently in the Journal of Psychiatric Research, finds that emotional trauma at a young age may cause changes to the brain that are similar to head trauma.

The connection between emotional trauma’s and physical trauma’s effect on the brain is an increase in a protein called S100B.  S100B is a protein usually found in the brain. But when the protein makes its way to the blood, this is a sign that the barrier that separates the brain from the rest of the body is leaky. This enables inflammatory compounds to make their way to the brain and perpetuate inflammation in the brain, often called neuroinflammation.

[…]

Dr. Falcone’s research team found that the same thing happens with emotional trauma as with physical trauma: the S100B protein levels are higher than normal. What’s more, the worse the trauma, the higher the levels of the S100B protein.

The researchers identified three important stressors that impact the intensity of the emotional trauma: how early in childhood the trauma occurred (if the trauma happen before age 8), the level of the trauma’s severity and whether the emotional trauma lasted longer than six months.

[…]

Although her team’s study results suggest a childhood trauma could cause inflammation in the brain that’s similar to what is seen in concussion, this inflammation could linger. This could lead to long-term consequences such as the development of psychiatric disorders later.”

By Children Health Team at Cleveland Clinic

Full article link below:

http://health.clevelandclinic.org/2015/03/emotional-traumas-surprising-effect-on-children/?utm_campaign=cc+posts&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook&utm_content=150317+emotional+trauma&dynid=facebook-_-cc+posts-_-social-_-social-_-150317+emotional+trauma