nervous system

Fertility & preconception, by Ingefleur Homeopathy

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” […] With the introduction of the contraceptive pill women have gotten more control over what is happening to their body when it comes to not falling pregnant. However, as many women have experienced, getting pregnant after several years of contraception may now not be so easy. This is not only because the natural hormone cycle is disturbed with contraception but also because women increasingly start having children at a later age.

Whether you have been on contraception or not, if you want to get pregnant the most important thing is that you are in the best health possible. To give your baby a good start you want the “soil” to be the best possible right? This means that your body systems should work the best possible and your toxicity levels as low as possible (this includes stress!), and that there needs to be plenty of nutrition. Remember that although the baby develops in your body and you need to be in the best condition possible, when trying for a baby your partner needs to be in the best health possible too!

Many factors can influence difficulty in conceiving. Factors for both males and females:

  • Obesity or lack of nutrition
  • Infections such as sexually transmitted diseases
  • Toxic metal levels in the body
  • Increased alcohol intrake
  • Smoking
  • Chronic stress
  • Unbalanced hormonal levels
  • Physical or emotional trauma
  • (Recreational) drugs
  • Chronic disease such as diabetes

Male specific factors that affect fertility:

  • Occupations that overheat the scrotum area such as men working in bakeries
  • Varicose veins in scrotum area
  • Other conditions such as raised sperm antibodies or chromosomal abnormalities

Female specific factors that affect fertility:

  • Chronic disease such as endometriosis, polycystic ovaries syndrome, diabetes
  • Fibroids
  • Structural abnormalities such as a tilted uterus
  • Hyper acidity
  • Chronic candida infection

This can be a scary list, however… many of these things can be dealt with! Some of the issues above you and partner can tackle yourselves:

  • Make any needed lifestyle changes. Make sure you get all your vitamins, minerals and fatty acids. Reduce alcohol intake, sugar intake, loose some weight if needed, consider seeing a nutritionist. Sleep enough, and get those stress levels down!
  • Make sure the guy’s semen is not overheated. So wear loose fitting underwear and clothing. Examine your lifestyle to see if there is anything that may cause overheating such as cycling or working in a bakery.
  • If you have been on the contraceptive pill, injections or coil, make sure you wait three months before you start trying (use condoms in the mean time). If you had a miscarriage wait preferably longer than that; up to 6 months to help the body recover from the trauma.
  • Don’t worry too much about when you are ovulating, just make sure you have sex three times a week at least. Charting can help however to give you an idea of whether you are ovulating and when.

Some of the factors in the (in)fertility list are not easily fixable with lifestyle changes. If you have done all the above and after 7 months to a year you have not fallen pregnant yet, it is a good idea to get yourselves checked out. Go to your GP and have all the regular tests done to see if there are any obvious reasons that you haven’t conceived yet.

Even if the tests are inconclusive however, homeopathic treatment can greatly raise your chances of conceiving.

[…]

Tip: if you like flower essences, try the Woman combination from Australian Bushflowers. It is a combination of flower essences aimed at anything female including premenstrual symptoms, menstrual symptoms, conception, pregnancy, post pregnancy and menopause. It is available in drops, a oral spray, and a cream (yummy!).”

By Ingefleur Spreij

Full article link below:

http://www.ingefleur.com/fertility.html

6 Ways CranioSacral Therapy Facilitates Brain Health, by Tad Wanveer, L.M.B.T., C.S.T.-D. in Massage Magazine

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“A primary focus of CranioSacral Therapy is to gently lessen the body’s connective tissue strain and decrease meningeal stress. CranioSacral Therapy is based partly on the theory that certain light-touch manual techniques can help relieve cell stress and improve health by enhancing the form and balance of the connective tissue matrix, in particular connective tissue layers surrounding the brain and spinal cord.

Enhanced brain form enables brain cells to work at their optimal level, which may improve molecular production, movement, use and clearance throughout the brain, leading to enhanced brain function and improved brain health. Because an emphasis of CranioSacral Therapy is on facilitating correction of the whole-body connective tissue matrix, it can be used for a wide range of conditions.”

By Tad Wanveer, L.M.B.T., C.S.T.-D.

Full article link below:

http://www.massagemag.com/6-ways-craniosacral-therapy-facilitates-brain-health-26528/

Nervous & Endocrine System

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” Within the internal environment, endocrine regulation is preeminent.

Cellular function is regulated and governed by hormones produced in the endocrine glands and conveyed to the appropriate site by the circulatory system.

The hormones are catalysts only – they do not add to the cells or alter their genetically determined purpose but are necessary to instigate and control specific cellular mechanisms which are implemented by enzymes.

Although the hormones and enzymes are among the latest physiologic catalysts to be discovered, they probably were one of the first means of regulation to evolve- a primitive system of controls which later surrendered part of its independence to the nervous system in the interests of faster and more specific action, particularly in emergencies.

Thus the endocrine system, as one of the major physiologic regulators, is now recognized as partly autonomous and partly associated with the neurologic coordinating system.

This is how hormone function can be influenced by psychological and emotional forces and can in turn initiate profound changes in both psychologic and physiologic aspects of nervous function.As one studies the increasing evidence of neuroendocrine interrelationships, it appears more and more certain that the nervous and endocrine systems are the prime regulators.

Viewed in this light, neuroendocrine mechanisms can be seen to operate as both cause and effect of physiologic events.”

“Osteopathic Medecine”

From HOAG, COLE, BRADFORD

Edition MC GRAW-HILL

1969