osteopath

5 Reasons Why Your Birth Can Affect Your Baby and Your Parenting; by SarahOckwell-Smith

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1) The birth can have lasting physical consequences for the baby

2) The birth can have lasting physical consequences for the mother.

3) The birth can have lasting psychological consequences for the baby

4) The birth can have lasting psychological consequences for the mother.

5)  The birth can have lasting psychological consequences for the father.

1) The birth can have lasting physical consequences for the baby

“Imagine if your head had been crooked at an unusual angle for several weeks, then imagine that somebody was pushing your head into that position even harder for a whole day, you’d have a headache and neck ache right? I have seen babies in obvious discomfort, several with torticollis unable to turn their head – aside from the discomfort this can also have an effect on feeding – several mums have said “he just won’t feed from that side and cries whenever we try” – they hadn’t considered it might be painful for their baby to turn their head to do so. Also when you start delving into the world of cranial nerves even more the whole

 issue becomes more complex. During labour the baby’s cranial bones move and overlap (think of a cone headed newborn!), this is normal and the bones usually return to their normal position over a few days after the birth, mostly via the process of the baby sucking (and the movement of the upper and lower jaw) which stimulates the base of the skull via the palate. Sometimes however things don’t return to normal and often abnormal skull compression becomes noticeable via the baby’s feeding habits and need to suck much more than usual. If the baby’s vagus nerve (the nerve directly linked to digestion) is compressed this can also have noticeable effects on a baby’s digestive system causing pain. All of this is more likely to happen if the labour is long, the baby is malpresented (I often notice babies who laid in an asynclitic presentation during labour are more fussy) or is born via emergency section, forceps or ventouse.”

2) The birth can have lasting physical consequences for the mother.

” […] I discovered that – hey pregnancy didn’t have to hurt! I was literally a changed woman. I was lucky in that I only suffered during pregnancy, but I have known plenty who continued to suffer after the birth, this affected their posture, but standing and seated and the constant discomfort slowly begins to erode into the psyche, along with the discomfort experienced whilst breastfeeding, often meaning babies are latched poorly – and we all know where that leads. It’s not just the pelvis and spine that matter though. I have met too many women suffering with perineal trauma, poorly stitched episiotomies and the like which not only cause great physical discomfort, but emotional too – which naturally has a knock on effect long after the event.”

3) The birth can have lasting psychological consequences for the baby

“Even those that have gone supposedly “well” or have been “natural”. The two big culprits to look out for here are the use of exogenous oxytocin (aka syntocinon/pitocin depending on where you’re reading from!) and what happened immediately after birth. Let’s start with the  artificial oxytocin. It’s impossible to talk about this without mentioning Michel Odent. In his article “If I were the baby: questioning the widespread use of synthetic oxytocin” Michel discusses the blood flow from mother to baby via the placenta and states the permeability is higher in the mother-foetal direction than vice versa (i.e: blood travels from the mum to baby via the placenta easily – so too therefore does whatever substance is travelling in the mother’s blood), Michel’s concern is the “oxytocin-induced desensitization of the oxytocin receptors”. “In other words, it is probable that, at a quasi-global level, we routinely interfere with the development of the oxytocin system of human beings at a critical phase for gene-environment interaction”. What does this mean in reality? well we know that when artificial oxytocin is put into the maternal blood stream during labour so to it enters the babies and can have profound and lasting consequences on the neurophysiology of the baby for the rest of their life.

Michel goes on to say “we now have scientific evidence that explains how the capacity to love develops through a complex interaction of hormones, hormones that are secreted during many experiences of love and close human interaction including sexual intercourse and conception, birth, lactation, and even sharing a meal with loved ones. The role of oxytocin, the “love hormone,” is particularly important. Natural oxytocin delivered by human touch, but not synthetic oxytocin delivered by an intravenous drip, has important effects on many organs in the body, including the brain. “  Those important effects, Odent theorises, can cause the baby to grow with damaged oxytocin receptors which he links to raising levels of autism, anxiety, stress and disturbed ”self loving” – including higher levels of anorexia, drug and alcohol dependency.

Not to mention on another level how traumatising birth is for babies – and here I am not implying birth needs to be traumatic for babies, when I trained in baby massage with Peter Walker he said to us “what if the process of birth was the very first massage we receive? what if birth is a pleasurable experience for the baby?” this really made me think – it’s what they are born into that is more traumatic – bright lights, rough handling, scratchy towels, cold instruments, latex gloves, cord clamps, silly hats and scratch mits, injections or bitter tasting oral drops. It’s no wonder babies cry when born! I was intrigued to learn of the importance of amniotic fluid in calming babies. When you think of this more deeply it’s kind of obvious – a baby spends 9mths in amniotic fluid – it is what you might  call “a constant”, naturally then the scent of the fluid on their skin (and that of their mother) after birth will be calming to them, reminding them of home you might say – yet, what do we do? we wipe it off, dry them and wrap them up in a rough towel – despite the fact there is sound scientific evidence to suggest this is the wrong thing to do – babies whose amniotic fluid is not wiped off after birth cry significantly  less (ref: H. Varendi et al., “Soothing effect of amniotic fluid smell in newborn infants,” Early Hum Dev (Estonia) 51, no. 1 (Apr 1998): 47-55) – and this is without even discussing skin to skin to contact (which we’ll do below).

4) The birth can have lasting psychological consequences for the mother.

“On a continuation of the above theme. We know that the blood brain barrier prevents artificial oxytocin from entering the brain – this may not seem important when you are told that you need an oxytocin drip to “speed up” or even start your labour – or when you are told it’s best you have an injection to deliver your placenta and prevent blood loss (all of which contain synthesised oxytocin) – but when you understand that this results in a direct lack of oxytocin circulating the maternal brain we begin to realise quite what catastrophic effects the usage off these supposedly “safe” chemicals can have upon the bonding of mother and child and the initiation (and even long term succcess)  of breastfeeding. We know oxytocin is the hormone of love and if we are depriving mothers of this in their brain it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to work out how we may be  damaging the love process between mother and baby. So often I work with new mothers ashamed to admit that they still dont know if they really love their babies or that it took them a long time, that there was no instant “rush of love”. I have experienced it both ways. My first two births were syntocinontastic, the first one I had “failed to progress” (or they had failed to wait – you decide!) and thus it was deemed my failure of a body couldn’t get my baby out without a drip to ramp up my contractions, I was then injected with syntometrine against my consent (i.e: I wasn’t even asked for consent – “I’m just giving you the injection for the placenta now dear” – jab and in it went before I had a chance to say anything) – my second birth was an induction for pre-eclampsia and I was told I HAD to have syntometrine because I was ill/had been induced (yes I know – I was young and naive, I know a lot more know and only wish I could turn back the clock!). Did I get that instant rush of love with those babies? Was breastfeeding easy? No. My last two babies were dramatically different though. My third son arrived at home, in a birth pool, in my dimly lit living room with an incredibly respectful midwife who didn’t touch us at all. Nobody, but me, laid hands on him until he was 3 days old. Oh my goodness now I knew what they meant by “love at first sight”. within 30 minutes of his birth (still in my arms in the pool) I would have died for  him – it was as if I was a bubble of golden, warm love. I have never felt so high, drugged or drunk in my life. THIS is how it should be and this was how it was for my last baby too, a birth very similar to my third.  The love was chemical and instant. I look at photos of my first two births and I can see shadows of the pain and indignity I had suffered, the trauma I had endured and the sheer relief it was over. Those same feelings of inadequacy, grief and confusion that lasted for years after the event. Is it any wonder why so many new mothers find it hard to bond with their baby? hard to interpret their cries? hard to hear their instinct? we strip so many mothers of the chemical euphoria they should experience and pay no attention to the after effects.”

5)  The birth can have lasting psychological consequences for the father.

“All too often we forget about the dads, but birth can be – and is – an immensely emotional event for the father, both positively and negatively. Nobody seems to care about the dads though, nobody holds their hand and tells them they are doing well, nobody hugs them and listens to their worries or tells them “it’s OK” to cry. We expect them to be a tower of strength and support – yet where is their support? the sooner we catch onto this the better.”

[…]

“[…] how must it feel to see your partner in distress – being cut or having a baby pulled out of her with great force? and then being sent home, alone, 2 hours later if your baby was born outside of visiting hours, yet we don’t seem to understand how traumatic witnessing a birth such as that can be for a dad – and the impact that can have upon his transition to fatherhood. Indeed we know when dads are supportive of breastfeeding the mother is much more likely to be successful and feed for longer, the birth can have a big impact on the  dad and thus impact on the support he is able to give to his partner.”

[…]

“I listen and I listen some more. For that mum or dad it may be the first time somebody has listened and never underestimate the impact that feeling listened to can have on somebody’s state of mind.”

Abstract from article by Sarah Ockwell-Smith

Full article link below:

http://sarahockwell-smith.com/2012/11/04/5-reasons-why-your-birth-can-affect-your-baby-and-your-parenting/

Temporal Bone Motion Asymmetry as a Cause of Vertigo: The Craniosacral Model; by David C. Christine

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Fertility & preconception, by Ingefleur Homeopathy

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” […] With the introduction of the contraceptive pill women have gotten more control over what is happening to their body when it comes to not falling pregnant. However, as many women have experienced, getting pregnant after several years of contraception may now not be so easy. This is not only because the natural hormone cycle is disturbed with contraception but also because women increasingly start having children at a later age.

Whether you have been on contraception or not, if you want to get pregnant the most important thing is that you are in the best health possible. To give your baby a good start you want the “soil” to be the best possible right? This means that your body systems should work the best possible and your toxicity levels as low as possible (this includes stress!), and that there needs to be plenty of nutrition. Remember that although the baby develops in your body and you need to be in the best condition possible, when trying for a baby your partner needs to be in the best health possible too!

Many factors can influence difficulty in conceiving. Factors for both males and females:

  • Obesity or lack of nutrition
  • Infections such as sexually transmitted diseases
  • Toxic metal levels in the body
  • Increased alcohol intrake
  • Smoking
  • Chronic stress
  • Unbalanced hormonal levels
  • Physical or emotional trauma
  • (Recreational) drugs
  • Chronic disease such as diabetes

Male specific factors that affect fertility:

  • Occupations that overheat the scrotum area such as men working in bakeries
  • Varicose veins in scrotum area
  • Other conditions such as raised sperm antibodies or chromosomal abnormalities

Female specific factors that affect fertility:

  • Chronic disease such as endometriosis, polycystic ovaries syndrome, diabetes
  • Fibroids
  • Structural abnormalities such as a tilted uterus
  • Hyper acidity
  • Chronic candida infection

This can be a scary list, however… many of these things can be dealt with! Some of the issues above you and partner can tackle yourselves:

  • Make any needed lifestyle changes. Make sure you get all your vitamins, minerals and fatty acids. Reduce alcohol intake, sugar intake, loose some weight if needed, consider seeing a nutritionist. Sleep enough, and get those stress levels down!
  • Make sure the guy’s semen is not overheated. So wear loose fitting underwear and clothing. Examine your lifestyle to see if there is anything that may cause overheating such as cycling or working in a bakery.
  • If you have been on the contraceptive pill, injections or coil, make sure you wait three months before you start trying (use condoms in the mean time). If you had a miscarriage wait preferably longer than that; up to 6 months to help the body recover from the trauma.
  • Don’t worry too much about when you are ovulating, just make sure you have sex three times a week at least. Charting can help however to give you an idea of whether you are ovulating and when.

Some of the factors in the (in)fertility list are not easily fixable with lifestyle changes. If you have done all the above and after 7 months to a year you have not fallen pregnant yet, it is a good idea to get yourselves checked out. Go to your GP and have all the regular tests done to see if there are any obvious reasons that you haven’t conceived yet.

Even if the tests are inconclusive however, homeopathic treatment can greatly raise your chances of conceiving.

[…]

Tip: if you like flower essences, try the Woman combination from Australian Bushflowers. It is a combination of flower essences aimed at anything female including premenstrual symptoms, menstrual symptoms, conception, pregnancy, post pregnancy and menopause. It is available in drops, a oral spray, and a cream (yummy!).”

By Ingefleur Spreij

Full article link below:

http://www.ingefleur.com/fertility.html

Sutherland’s Legacy in the New Millennium: The Osteopathic Cranial Model and Modern Osteopathy.

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“Abstract

The concept of cranial osteopathy was introduced by W. G. Sutherland, DO, and became the foundation for setting the rules for use of skull palpation and many other techniques in the many types of dysfunctional patterns that craniosacral therapy treats. Sutherland’s theories enabled modern osteopathy to develop and improve. The mechanism of primary respiration as well as the motion of neurocranial and viscerocranial sutures are phenomena intrinsic to the field and can be found in every living organism, independent of thoracic breathing and cardiac impulse. The sphenobasilar synchondrosis (ie, the joint between the base of the occiput and the body of the sphenoid bone) is the pillar supporting the concepts of craniosacral therapy. This article compares the cranial model devised by Sutherland with the present, relevant scientific research, aiming at clarifying the possibility of applying the craniosacral model in the new millennium.”

By Bordoni B., Zanier E.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25831430