somatic dysfunction

“Craniosacral-therapy for people seeking relief from stress, muscle strain, somatic dysfunction”, By Nicole Nalepa & Joseph Wenzel IV, News Editor

Posted on Updated on

“A light-touch technique is gaining popularity among those dealing with pain and disorders.

[…]

Craniosacral therapy is a new kind of holistic treatment that’s started gaining popularity with some who are looking for relief from stress, strained muscles, or a dysfunction.
[…]

The difference between craniosacral therapy and a massage is therapists aren’t pushing the tissue around, they are mobilizing the tissue through a very light, manual touch on and along the bones, which are located from your skull all the way down to your pelvis.

[…]

“The ability to feel or palpate, is a trained, refined sensitivity in your hands,” Larson said. “What this does is it gets to the core. It really helps that central nervous system reset.”

Larson said she can feel the patterns of strain in the cerebrospinal fluid, which houses the brain and spinal column.

The weight of the pressure that you’re seeing being exerted right now on this client is […] between 0 grams to 5 grams; and 5 grams being the equivalent to the weight of a nickel.

[…]

“It’s not like a deep-tissue massage, or anything like that. It’s very, very relaxing, but in a different way,” Paradis said. “When I came in it was like my brain was having a little meltdown; there were all these synapses going off and little fireworks; and by the time I left that was kind of all calmed down and I could think clearly and process easier.”

Since her first session, four months ago, her daily headaches have stopped and she says she has been able to sleep better.[…]”

By Nicole Nalepa and Joseph Wenzel

For Cheryl Larson, licensed massage therapist
Full link to article below:

http://www.wfsb.com/story/28708086/craniosacral-therapy-become-popular-for-people-seeking-relief

“The Art of Breathing: Drawing the Diaphragm”, By Rolf Sovik, article in Yoga International

Posted on Updated on

This article is very interesting to help with the visualization of this very important muscle called the Diaphragm. In Osteopathy, the Diaphragm  is a key structure to assess; it is also called the main breathing muscle.

The Diaphragm has many anatomical connections with visceras/internal organs: two main blood vessels go through it (vena cava and abdominal aorta), its movement during inhalation and exhalation encourage intestinal transit/bowel movements, helping to drain the body toxins, and it also delimits the boundary between the thoracic cavity and the abdominal cavity. Therefore, the Diaphragm muscle is a key area to check due to its implication in the balance between the thoracic pressure and the abdominal pressure. Any dysfunction affecting this muscle will have consequences on the body function.

https://yogainternational.com/article/view/the-art-of-breathing-drawing-the-diaphragm

Dysfunction, disease

Posted on Updated on

“If we accept the concept that each of us consists of an orderly grouping of cells living within a fluid matrix, and that health represents a situation in which the internal environment is maintained within homeostatic limits by the integrating systems of the body, then it is logical to postulate that disease is an alteration in these mechanisms which permits or forces a departure from these homeostatic limits, resulting in altered function or physiology.”

“Osteopathic Medecine”

From HOAG, COLE, BRADFORD

Edition MC GRAW-HILL

1969

Disorders of the Endocrine System,

William Baldwin, Jr

Chapt 16

p. 228

Osteopathy For Adults

Posted on Updated on

Adults can experience aches or pain resulting from a trauma, their lifestyle and/or repetitive strain from their position at work. Therefore, the osteopath will assess the posture and possible causes of somatic dysfunctions. There is a balance to find between static or dynamic activity. Previous trauma (physical and/or emotional) could have predisposed to the current problem if left unresolved. The body has very strong ability to compensate or adapt up to a certain point. Inflammation is seen as a signal sent by the body to the brain that something is wrong and needs to be addressed. It is very important to acknowledge those signals, and make changes to prevent further health problems. Osteopathy can be helpful to identify the problem and releasing tightness, aches, pain allowing the body to recover and heal naturally when it is possible. Patients need to make some changes in their life to prevent the same problem to come back or get worse. Osteopathy is known for helping when a problem has arisen but prevention and maintenance is important as well. For an osteopath, other symptoms are seen as signals too. Some symptoms can be related to mechanical dysfunctions in the body. The main links are vascular and/or neurologic. This is the reason why, each individual is anatomically and physiologically submitted to the same rules, but each individual has a different story, and variations in adaptation and compensation pattern. The osteopath will try to understand how you ended up experiencing the symptoms you are presenting with and guide you towards a specialist when necessary.